Tips & Tricks

Check out a variety of MTB tips and tricks from the experts here at BikeCo.com. From bike maintenance, setup, as well as on trail solutions – we have you covered.

What to look for on a demo bike ride BikeCo

What to look for in a demo bike ride

Another great week getting riders on the latest Ibis demos here at BikeCo.com. As the newest release the Ripmo was extremely popular as riders define what the latest 29er’s are all about. We saw many new faces at this demo. A lot of riders are upgrading from first bikes into better handling suspension systems such as DW, Switch Infinity and Sine. Many of these riders took out the Mojo 3 to see what a 27.5 trail bike offers. As [...]

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Magura Race vs Performance Pads Review

Magura Performance vs Race Brake Pad Review

Initial Ride Test – Magura Performance vs Race Brake Pad Review for MT5 / MT7 models. I love my Magura MT5 brakes. That’s well established here on BikeCo.com at this point I’m sure! Until this month however I had never run the Magura Race Brake pads. I decided to change it up a bit on the last pad change – and WHOA, quite a difference. Magura 8.P Performance Brake Pads As a baseline, I have had no complaints on the Magura 8.P [...]

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11 12 18 Worn MTB Brake Pads

MTB Brake Pad Wear Limits

Safety, Performance, Predictability. All are reasons to check your brake pads regularly and change as appropriate.  Let’s look at some basics about MTB Brake Pad Wear Limits. First – when is a pad worn?   Magura, SRAM & Shimano Brake Pad Wear Limits Brake pads are considered worn well before the pad material is completely gone. The image above (and text below) are published manufacturer sizes. (reference links below). Magura brakes are to be replaced as soon as the backing plate and pad material [...]

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Bottom Bracket height and crank arm length

Bottom Bracket Height and Crank Arm Length

New Bikes, First Rides, Pedal Strikes, Bottom Bracket Height and Crank Arm Length. Well it wouldn’t be BikeCo.com without courting a bit of controversy so might as well start it out on a Monday! Let’s begin with the disclaimers – this is not a medical post. I do not have a kinesiology background so can’t speak to the physical mechanics of what you’ve got going on. I do feel I can speak to my riding experience over the years on [...]

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10 8 18 Rear Suspension Setup by BikeCo

Rear Suspension Setup

Some quick reminders on rear suspension setup! The Best Baseline Measure the sag. The old days of eye balling (or using a finger versus a thumb) are gone. The introduction of Metric shocks created a huge variety of stokes making it more important to measure the sag in millimeters. For instance, the Yeti SB150 has a 230x60mm shock however the exposed shaft is about 9% longer. This might not sound like much the difference between a perceived 33% sag at 20mm and [...]

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9 21 18 Late vs Early Apex Cornering9 21 18 Late vs Early Apex Cornering

Late Apex vs Early Apex Cornering

I had a handful of questions on Late Apex vs Early Apex Cornering after the Yeti SB130 review earlier this week. Lets go over some of the advantages of late apex, or “squaring” the corner when pleasure riding your MTB. The image below illustrates Late Apex vs Early Apex cornering lines. The green line represents the late apex while orange is early apex.   Line of Sight This is the most notable improvement in the late apex corner for pleasure riders. Running on [...]

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9 19 18 Compression Damper Blog BikeCo

Suspension Compression Tuning Basics

So you’ve gone through our volume spacing and sag calculators – ready for the next step? Let’s go over some Suspension Compression Tuning Basics. The compression circuit of your MTB suspension is one of the more misunderstood adjustments you have at your disposal. A good reason for this is frankly MTB suspension tends to be over compressed for the average rider. “I run my shocks completely open” isn’t an uncommon answer, particularly with stock suspension. The compression circuit is designed to [...]

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BikeCo Partial and Full Fork Services

BikeCo Full and Partial Fork Services

For the best performance it is important to properly service MTB suspension. BikeCo Full and Partial Fork Services provide 3 options to keep suspension riding at its best. Partial Fork Service from $40, Full Fork Service Level A from $125 and Full Fork Service Level B from $175.   These services maintain both standard and Pro Tune forks. Running a stock fork? Learn more about advantages of BikeCo Pro Tunes here. Service interval recommendations are based upon mileage, riding conditions, riding style as [...]

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9 6 18 Back on Flats Pedal Blog

Back To Flats or, Flats For My Back

Back To Flats is a bit of a misnomer. I’ve occasionally rode flats over the years to avoid developing too many bad habits. But since I began riding it’s been on clipless pedals. Chronic lower back pain has me working on different solutions to stay on the bike. So Flats For My Back might be a more accurate title… Check out a blog: Back to Flats Riding Flat Pedals. Don’t have back pain? Keep reading it’s about more than me [...]

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9 4 18 Volume Sag Calculator BikeCo

Fork Volume Spacing Calculator with Sag

We had a lot of click through, emails, chats, etc on the previous volume spacing calculator. We decided to produce second to help riders better understand tuning windows. Check out BikeCo’s Fork Volume Spacing Calculator with Sag. Like the previous calculator this works best on a computer. It will work on a mobile device however the data will stack vertically. It is again based on the basic dimensions of a 160mm Fox 36 Float Grip 2 fork. Expanding on the concepts [...]

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