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Peas & Carrots: Custom Mullet Yeti SB165

Custom Mullet Yeti SB165

Enjoy some shots of this custom Mullet Yeti SB165 build by BikeCo.com. This Yeti Moss Green frame is set off with orange accents from Fox Suspension as well as CushCore valve stems.

Park, big mountain and enduro riding are on the slate for this build. Contact points include Ergon GE1 Evo Factory Grips, Ergon SM Enduro saddle as well as HT Component Pedals.

 

BikeCo Pro Tune Decals on Fox 38 Fork

 

The 29″ front wheel provides additional roll over capacity while slightly mellowing the steering input. The smaller, stock, 27.5″ wheel in the rear gives riders more room to maneuver when jumping the bike as well as turns corners more quickly.  The slightly smaller circumference will accelerate more quickly when you jump on the power out of a corner.

 

Tag Metals MTB Stem and Bar combination

 

A popular “new” entrant to MTB at this level Tag Metals offer an excellent stem. Light and stiff the T1 stem transfers power well. The T1 Carbon bars are stiff enough to be effective without crossing into the “teeth rattler” realm some carbon bars are known to hit. Shop Handlebars here.

Another popular spec here at The Bike Company are Magura brakes. This bike features the MT7 brakes with HC levers. Magura’s 4 piston brakes allow riders to have both power and modulation. Modulation is defined as how the brake ramps into it’s power. For instance putting a stick in your spokes has a ton of instant stopping power, but, it’s gonna be hard to control. Conversely putting your foot on the back of the wheel (remember no brake bikes as kids?) isn’t going to stop you quick enough. These same issues are prevalent in MTB brakes. Some brakes bring the power on too quickly which can make them hard to control particularly in wet or low traction conditions. Other brakes lack the total power to confidently slow riders down. Magura has spent years dialing in the balance allowing riders to fine tune performance with rotor size and pad compounds. Find Magura Brakes Here.

 

Magura MT7 with HC Lever

Magura MT7 Caliper on Moss Green Mullet Yeti SB165

Custom Mullet Yeti SB165

 

HT Components Pedal mounted to RaceFace Next R Carbon Cranks

 

AE03 EVO+ Stealth pedals give the perfect look with their stealth graphics and black traction pins. RaceFace Next R carbon cranks transfer power to the SRAM drivetrain. Shop flat pedals here.

 

Thrust Bearing on MTB Coil Shock

 

The devil’s in the details and here’s a good one… Chat with our team about your next dream bike or dialing in your current rig!

 

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Custom Yeti SB165 Build – ENVE, AXS

Custom Yeti SB165 Build

Custom Yeti SB165 Build

Enjoy some pics of this out of control custom Yeti SB165 build. Every aspect of this build has been taking into consideration from tip to tail.

Some of the build highlights include:
ENVE M7 carbon cockpit and M730 rims.
SRAM AXS Drivetrain.
Cane Creek EEWings Titanium Cranks (Tie-Dye).
Ergon grips and saddle.
Magura Brakes.
Chris King headset and hubs.
The list goes on and on!

 

SRAM AXS Eagle Oil Slick / Rainbow Chain and Cassette

 

The turquoise derailleur hanger provides a small, simple accent that plays a bit part in pulling this bike’s colorway together.

The new 52t SRAM Eagle cassette gives riders even a bit more gear to climb the burliest terrain.

Ride-Wrap frame protection will help keep this bike looking new well into its service life.

 

ENVE M7 stem with titanium oil slick hardware

 

It’s important to keep an eye on your titanium hardware. You don’t want it to seize (read, you don’t want to have to try to drill Titanium…) nor do you want it to back out. Pedro’s clicker tools are a great way to quickly check torque before your ride. Find more of our favorite SHOP TOOLS here.

 

Magura 4 piston brake caliper

 

Continuing with the attention to detail check out the polished Magura 4 piston brakes front and rear! Oil slick titanium hardware continues to set off these components.

Magura HC rotors, Chris King Matte Turquoise hubs and DT Swiss spokes make an appearance in this pic.

 

Custom Yeti Builds by BikeCo.com

 

Another look at this custom Yeti SB165 build…

In the market? Chat with our team about the perfect bike. Whether you’re shopping a total custom, a factory build with upgrades, a stock kit or a frame / frame kit upgrade we have you covered.

We offer riders access to the best brands, with the longest service intervals no matter budget. Our team is unmatched helping clients dial in setup before and after delivery.

Want to take your bike to the next level? Chat with us about our proprietary Pro Tune options to personalize your suspension setup.


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CushCore XC Install & Ride Review

CushCore XC Install and Review with video

CushCore XC Install & Ride Review

CushCore XC Install and Review with video

I started thinking about rim protection a few rides ago. I managed to shove a branch through the center of a tire. Murphy’s law meant it went straight through a spoke hole puncturing the tubeless tape. No quick fix to that one on trail… Before we get into the CushCore XC Install & Ride Review here’s a quick bio and which aspects of my riding suggested rim protection because frankly, I didn’t see myself as a candidate for CushCore.

Riding Bio (R) / Purchasing Bio (P):

R: I’ve been riding long enough that I feel competent in most terrain. I have enough gray hair to know I don’t need to be pushing into the red zone risking crashes. Maximum performance isn’t necessarily my goal, but I don’t want to leave performance on the table either.

P: While traction is game changing for confidence, I’m confident in my particular terrain, and not really out searching for the biggest / burliest lines. I’m not sure I’d pencil in tire protection based on the bio above.

I knew I would be testing this product in a true sense – it might be right for me or it might not.

Balancing tire pressure, tire retention (ie not burping) and sidewall performance have a huge effect on your bike’s personality.


Rear Tire Compression and Deflection
I was shooting self-portraits for the Ride Concept shoe launch when I caught this image. I was going relatively slow and easy (about a bike length roll in) over this rock so the amount of tire deflection caught me off guard and made me think about rim protection more seriously.

R: As a heavier rider with decent cornering I run substantial PSI (around 32) to keep from burping tires. Currently I’ve been riding Maxxis EXO+ sidewalls for the additional support, protection and notably improved damping (another convo for another day).

P: Some of CushCore’s biggest draws are the lower PSI, additional sidewall support and to a lesser extent tire pressure ramp. CushCore PRO and XC both act as a volume spacer for your tire as well as contacting the tire’s sidewall, lowering the leverage and adding support.

Burping tires is a sign that you lack support for the conditions. But at over 30 PSI in most conditions I know I’m leaving traction on the table – but I like keeping both air and sealant in the tire. The options here would be going to a Double Down sidewall or looking at rim protection to get the pressures down a bit.


R: I don’t often flat, but, the last two flats I’ve had have been a pain to deal with on-trail.

P: CushCore will help minimize pinch flats providing material between your rim lip and tire. It will also help protect rim tape from deep punctures like mentioned above.

While it might not eliminate all sidewall cuts there are certainly conditions where a bit more sidewall support will get you rolling past the shark’s tooth trying to cut into your tire.

Another factor I considered was a CushCore would help me get out after a near flat and low PSI condition without too much stress on the wheels.


R: I ride aluminum rims. My front wheel tends to stay in good condition. The rear? Well, I’ve been known to be hard on those.

P: Protecting carbon rims from karate chop hits with at least a CushCore XC is a good idea.

Aluminum rims might cost less than carbon, but if you’re constantly bashing on aluminum the maintenance costs add up and the interval between service will continue to decrease. You’ve got to keep them true and tensioned, rim edges start taking a beating and might not seat tires as well. Etc, etc.

And when finish one off it’s still going to cost you spokes, nipples and labor to get back out on trail.


R: I’m not a great climber (I have no idea what this “pain cave” people talk about is in riding – I’m looking for the Fiesta Plateau hahaha) and everyone I ride with is faster than me uphill – so – compromising climbing performance isn’t big on my list of “to-dos”.

P: Well weight is weight. And rolling weight factors out even more. However, the weight can have benefits (I can’t even imagine riding skinwall tires these days) so it might be worth a chat.

I’ve added rolling weight going to the more substantial EXO+ tires without noting too much grief so I thought a CushCore XC would behave similarly.


R: While fairly adept mechanically I don’t need any additional work or pain in the ass processes in my life.

P: CushCore PRO requires more patience to mount. The CushCore XC is easier to mount as it’s less substantial. I figured if I could get the XC on without too much heartache it would hit my requirements.


You can see the purchasing bio weaves back and forth on whether rim protection was for me. I thought about whether I’d prefer rim protection or going from an EXO+ to a DD Double Down tire as well.

So what put me over? The last couple flats I’ve had have been a pain. The most recent would still have compromised a tire, but with a CushCore to protect the tape I could have used a Stan’s Dart or equivalent.

My previous flat to that was a slice in the sidewall that I believe a CushCore (or the DD) would have prevented.

Finally my rear rim is kind of at a point where if I slowed the wear and tear I’ll get a notably longer service interval out of it.

Not to mention I thought it would be interesting to work with tire pressure and check on gains from a bit more damping from the tire setup.

And, truth be told, I get to write articles about it to help clients and call it work! Sorry boys, gotta go test…

CushCore XC Install:

You can check out the video for the actual installation of my CushCore XC as well as some tips on taping a tubeless rim.

I found following the steps to install a CushCore Pro with the XC were problematic for me. As I worked the first tire bead the CushCore would fall out of the bottom of the wheel. After a couple tries I ventured off into my “I think this will work better” mode…

What I found was mounting one side of the tire bead, inserting the CushCore into the tire and then mounting the second bead worked well.

To stretch the new CushCore over the rim I found getting low gave me the best leverage. This meant I could push with my arms instead of just pulling with my hands. Also, for the last third or so rather than pushing in a thumb width at a time I would stretch the insert about a fist width then drive that into trough.

I managed to mount the insert and tire without levers. Which says a lot as I have bad hands and use levers nearly all the time!

Watching the video over my shoulder Joe pointed out he can do that with the CushCore Pro’s too. Not sure I want to try that – but its possible!

CushCore XC Ride Review

PSI Dial In

There’s a fun little test trail in San Diego called E-Ticket. Relatively short, not super burly and has some high G corners with a bit of rock to bang into if you choose.

Best part? SDMBA tool kit at the top complete with a pump! Put the digital gauge in the pocket and do a handful of drops at different pressures.

I typically run about 32 PSI in my rear tire. I decided to start at 28 and work my way down looking for tell-tale x’s or slashes in the tire sidewall.

At 28 I didn’t see any sidewall loading. After a couple drops I found around 23/24 PSI I had X’s in the sidewalls, typically a sign that you’re about a PSI or so too low.

Tire sidewall X'sJust a little low on the PSI for my taste. The X markings have me increase pressure about 2 PSI.

You’re looking for “/” marks showing some deformation but less than the “X”. The tires felt like they behaving, I didn’t notice squirm or roll, but sidewall marks have always been a good reference for me.

After another drop or two I settled in with a sweet spot around 26/27 psi. About 6 psi, or nearly 20% lower air pressure from my typical. This also let me keep the rear tire at the same PSI as the front. It seemed sacrilege to run less PSI in the rear…

CushCore XC On Trail

Deciding that 26.5 would be the test pressure I put a few test rides in.

Climbing

My biggest fear was getting so soft or heavy that climbing would be notably compromised.

As far as the weight – much like the jump to EXO+ from EXO tires – as long as I wasn’t in full “trudge” mode it wasn’t too bad. If I could keep some momentum on the wheel and a clean cadence through the pedals I was happy with it. If I was riding slow enough to “stall” the wheel or quit paying attention to spinning good circles with the pedals (which I’m notorious for) I could feel the added weight. But in most conditions it wasn’t a notable thing.

In fact climbing some of the chunkier trails in my networks I found the added traction was a nice feature. The mental “this should stick” versus “I’m probably going to spin it out and not make it up” made a difference.

Cornering

It’s certainly not a secret that traction is confidence in the corners. But if the sidewalls start rolling or squirming around you feel like the bike (and thus you, the rider) might fling themselves past the tire’s contact patch.

Without tire inserts I frequently burp tires in the 30 PSI range so heading into fast corners in the 26 PSI had me attentive the first few times. I heard the growl of the tire working into the corners but not the tell tale “hiss” when you slip a bead. No spray on the tire at the end of the rides either.

The bike felt like it was on rails rather than having a bit of skip and slide at the same speed and higher PSI.

What I Noticed Most

This sort of surprised me actually – but what I noticed most with the CushCore XC setup was when you float off a waterbar or whatever into a corner.

Without the insert I felt like my bike had two small wiggles, or spikes when it landed and you tried to instantly change direction. Not sure if it was bounce from the PSI or sidewall wiggle or whatever but it had a distinct extra motion side to side.

With the CushCore the bike just stuck. Instantly. Even if you started leaning the bike before you landed it was well behaved. This got me paying attention to other conditions that would really test initial or small bump compliance.

The setup’s additional small bump compliance is really notable. Similarly braking is improved as the tire is more apt to dig in then skip over.

What I Wonder About

The improved small bump compliance and damping does have another side to it. Pushing the bike hard the rear end is a bit more “numb” than before. I don’t notice it at slower speeds but as I creep into the faster stuff I think I loose a little bit of feel out of the rear end. Now whether that’s good or bad I’m not sure just yet. It’s just different.

I wonder how it would feel in really choppy terrain at speed. Will the bike react as I suspect? Will it kind of monster truck over without my input making as much of a difference? Not sure yet. I guess the other side to that is in a choppy, high speed, high stress situation is when you’re most likely to karate chop a rim or pinch flat a tire. So maybe it all would balance out? Definitely haven’t heard any rim “tings” with the insert.

Is a CushCore XC is for me long term or not? You know I haven’t made my mind up just yet. When I went to the more aggressive EXO+ sidewall instead of the lighter EXO option I wasn’t sure I’d stick with it either. With the sidewalls I decided they were for me when I quit thinking about it every ride. Will the CushCore get there? We’ll see – so far it’s passing the tests.

Wondering if a CushCore PRO or XC is for you? Or questions on sidewall technology? Reach out to our expert team today to discuss your riding bio, terrain and aspirations. Our staff will help you dial in the best setup.

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Pro Tune Suspension for Specialized

BikeCo Pro Tune Specialized Enduro or Stumpjumper

Pro Tune Suspension for Specialized Enduro & Stumpjumper

Specialized Enduro Pro Tune Suspension

We are excited to offer BikeCo Pro Tunes for the Specialized Enduro & Stumpjumpers equipped with FOX suspension. Pro Tune Suspension for Specialized bikes will take your bike’s performance to the next level.

After extensive testing our range of Specialized Pro Tunes will narrow the FOX performance window to your riding specifics. Depending on your size, riding style, terrain and ground speeds our team will create a profile to fine tune your FOX shock.

With proprietary lubes, custom design shim profiles and our unique (very thorough) bleeds your Enduro or Stumpjumper rear shock will have improved small bump compliance, heat resistance, bottom out and support. Each click of rebound and compression will be a more finite adjustment allowing more precise setup whether you’re riding your local loop, an epic trip or a weekend’s race.

BikeCo Pro Tunes bring out the ultimate performance across a growing range of brands. Specialized is the latest addition to suspension designs such as VPP, DW, Switch Infinity and more. With each design our tunes are modified dependent on leverage ratios, bike lengths, chainstay lengths and stock shock designs.

With so many controls on modern shocks it’s easy to be confused when working to improve a single aspect. Pro Tune clients have access to our team to help with initial setup as well as advice for changes to your suspension as your riding develops.

Compression, rebound, volume spacing and PSI balance compliance, support and feel. Why not have access to Joe Binatena and our team of suspension tuners to dial in your bike?

Pro Tune Specialized Enduro and Stumpjumper

Common Issues for Stock Suspension

Stock shocks have to work for a wide range of riders. Weight, aggression and ground speed variations mean stock suspension is asked to be something for everything. There are a handful of typical issues BikeCo Pro Tunes address.

Compliance. Lighter riders often find bikes over compressed with poor small bump compliance. These are similiar issues for riders on the slower or medium ground speed ranges as the bike doesn’t build up the necessary momentum to really activate the dampers.

Support. Tied to issues with compliance for many riders. In order to improve compliance it’s common to run a lower PSI. However this increases your sag percentage which decreases support, top out and ramp rate.

Heat Resistance. Our proprietary lubes are designed maximize the balance between heat resistance and fluid flow dependent on ground speed and rider weight. Our bleed quality reduces air ingress to the oil which provides better performance with less variation between the beginning of your descent and the end.

Specialized Pro Tunes

Pro Tune Suspension for Specialized

Your Specialized Enduro or Stumpjumper’s performance can be taken to a whole other level with BikeCo Pro Tunes. Dialing in the rear shock, fork as well as cockpit and wheels are common upgrades for Specialized riders here at BikeCo.com.

Understanding your Specialized Enduro or Stumpjumper’s setup will increase your riding enjoyment and improve your learning curve. With our Pro Tunes and follow up services we will help take your Specialized from “pretty good” to “oh man, this is dialed!”

Ready to take your Enduro or Stumpjumper to the next level? Reach out to our team to start the process today:

Pro Tune Input

Want to learn more about how BikeCo Pro Tunes benefit riders from Novices to Racers? You know what, before we get you that link let’s touch on something:

We named this service Pro Tune Suspension, but an argument could be made that the earlier you are in your riding journey the MORE that Pro Tuned suspension will help. Why learn or master skills to compensate for poorly setup or poor handling suspension when you could have your bike dialed in by the experts and work to learn proper skills and techniques?

Learn more about the benefits across the board on Pro Tune Suspension here.


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Ibis HD5 Mullet

Mullet Ibis HD5 Build

Ibis HD5 Mullet

Well, like any great mystery there’s only one image of this one, but at least it’s not blurry… This Ibis HD5 Mullet was wrapped up late but we had to shoot it before it went to it’s new home.

This bike features a slightly under-traveled fork to keep the mullet’s 29″ front end at a similar total height of the 27.5″ option. This gives the bike a more “as designed” headtube angle and therefor trail measurement.

Building a Mullet with the same amount of fork travel would notably slacken the bike out. When you go too slack with a bike it doesn’t want to change direction due to increase in the wheel flop as well as the modified contact points.

Working to keep the axle to crown measurement closer to the 27.5″ design allows BikeCo’s mullet builds to maintain a personality closer to the stock design. The advantages of the bigger wheel include increased angle of attack from the larger diameter, slightly mellower handling from the larger wheel / mass as well as notably improved braking.

Highlights of this Mullet HD5

Built for a long-time BikeCo client this is a special bike and it was great to see it leave the shop with a stoked rider.

BikeCo Pro Tune suspension front and rear help personalize the performance window and setup.

Industry Nine stem and Chris King inset headset in orange give the bike some added pop. One-Up carbon bar, seatpost and chain guide. SRAM X01 AXS drivetrain with a 52t copper cassette and a Wolf Tooth Oval chainring drive the bike. Magura MT7 with HC3 levers and Hope 2 piece orange rotors stop it.

And once again this build is highlighted with custom Chris King wheels. The matte mango King hubs are laced to WTB aluminum KOM Tough rims with DT Swiss spokes.

Chris King hubs, serviced approximately yearly, have a near infinite service life. King products are made in Portland Oregon giving your bike some Made in the USA credibility. Wolf Tooth as well as some Industry Nine products are as well.

In the market? Email, call or chat in to go through your riding requirements with our team today.


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Custom Yeti SB140

Custom Yeti SB140 Build by BikeCo.com

Custom Yeti SB140

Enjoy a few pics of this custom Yeti SB140 build by BikeCo.com.

The Yeti SB140 fits in the mid travel 27.5″ wheel trail to light enduro category well. Designed as a poppy, flickable bike Yeti’s Switch Infinity gives the bike just the right amount of pop when pumping the trails.

This build is a size small and you see details that benefit a smaller / lighter rider.

First is the standard 27.5″ front wheel. While a mullet concept could be on the table for some smaller riders, this client prefers the quicker handling of the 27.5″ front.

You’ll also notice the 31.85mm RaceFace Next handlebars. Lighter riders can utilize the extra damping from the smaller diameter bar and stem to minimize hand pump and fatigue. This is doubly important for small and light riders since as we trim bars shorter to fit shoulder width we decrease the leverage. With less length and thus less leverage the bar becomes stiffer.

 

Custom Yeti SB140 RaceFace Cockpit

 

Chris King dropset headset in matte mango and a One-Up EDC orange top cap highlight the front end of the bike.

This build is slowed by Magura MT5 brakes with HC levers. This is an incredibly popular option for riders who are looking for the ultimate performance on a budget. Magura MT5 brakes provide excellent modulation and power while saving some dollars to put other places on your build!

 

Magura MT5 with HC Levers

 

Who Stops You?

The HC lever features a 1 finger shape with hooked blade for better finger retention in the rough stuff. Adjustable reach is controlled with the easily labeled allen set screw shown above.

If you’ve bounced around BikeCo.com you’ve seen a variety of posts about how positive our experiences are individually riding Magura MT5 and MT7 brakes. New to Magura? Chat with our team about the details on dialing in the right modulation, power and leverage.

 

NOX Farlow Rims

 

One of the favorite carbon rims: NOX Farlow. NOX Farlow rims have a 29mm internal width which pairs well with 2.3 to 2.6″ tire options.

Hard on rims? Consider adding CushCore rim protection to your build. CushCore offers the PRO and XC option in pairs or singles.

These Chris King / NOX Farlow wheels were hand built by our team with DT Swiss spokes. Lighter riders often benefit from mixing spokes for added wheel compliance and better small bump performance.

On another note – I love the bleed valves on the 2021 FOX 36 forks. Great to burp the gas gulp or buildup to improve small bump compliance. Especially if you have substantial altitude changes.

 

Yeti SB140 Custom Complete

More Custom SB140 Details

The One-Up adjustable post allows smaller, well and taller riders as well, the ability to adjust post travel.

This bike parallels how many of us here at BikeCo.com spec our own bikes. Magura MT5 brakes and SRAM GX drivetrain provide great performance without breaking the bank. That budget is reallocated to FOX Factory suspension and top tier hand-built wheels.

BikeCo Pro Tune Suspension front and rear will help this lighter rider get the best small bump compliance as well as shifting the compression controls into usable ranges. Think of Pro Tunes as narrowing and shifting the performance band depending on rider size, speed, aggression and terrain. By narrowing the performance window each click of rebound and compression is closer together making a more usable range of adjustments.

Custom Builds, Personalized Setup & Tunes

At BikeCo.com we provide access to the best setup, spec and tunes in MTB. The attention to detail whether you’re shopping a complete custom, factory build with upgrades, stock bike or simply a frame swap is unmatched.

Our team is able to help riders define what components will give their specific riding the most bang for the buck.

In the market? Call, email or chat in today!


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Mullet Ibis HD5

Mullet Ibis HD5 Build

Mullet Ibis HD5

Enjoy a couple photos of this Mullet Ibis HD5 before it heads to it’s new home.

Mullet setups consist of a 29″ front fork and wheel with a 27.5″ rear wheel. Generally mullet bikes are based around 27.5″ frames to keep the bottom bracket from dropping as it would on a 29″ bike.

The larger front wheel offers some interesting advantages that mullet riders take advantage of. Notably are the improved roll over or angle of attack from the larger diameter, the slightly mellowed steering input from the larger wheel as well as improved braking performance.

When we first started testing Mullet HD5 setups we gained a lot of insight from BikeCo Pro Rider Brian Lopes. Brian pointed out how much harder he could confidently get on the brakes before and even into a corner on the larger front wheel.

With a smaller rear tire riders are also able to stay lower on the bike in the steeps or the air. The 27.5″ rear tends to be faster and more agile around tight corners in steep terrain as well. This is one of the reasons you see so many Mullet’s on the EWS circuit – although you may have to look closely as not every brand acknowledges the larger wheel option!

Ibis HD5 Mullet Build

Building a Mullet

We’ve been testing a variety of mullet setups over the past couple seasons. What we’ve found is running a slightly under-traveled fork helps maintain the bike’s personality and performance.

Since the last few mm’s of your bike’s suspension really aren’t where you’re living through the stroke few riders notice that compromise. Compare this to adding a bunch of trail and headtube angle (and with those adding wheel flop) which riders will notice quickly when trying to change directions. Almost every rider leans towards having better handling!

The larger front wheel also creates some “false travel” to make up for some of the change to accommodate the axle to crown measurement.

Questions? No problem. Our team has the answers to help you spec the right bike or upgrades. Call, email or chat today.

Build Details

This HD5 build is highlighted with some of the best bits available in MTB.

FOX Factory Suspension front and rear is Pro Tuned for a personalized setup specific to rider weight, aggression, ground speeds and terrain. With Pro Tune suspension we narrow FOX’s performance range for an individual client. This means every click is a more minute adjustment providing riders even more performance from their FOX forks and shocks.

SRAM X01 AXS shift pod and rear derailleur control a 52t copper cassette and 12sp copper chain pulled by RaceFace Next-R carbon cranks and a Wolf Tooth chainring. The X01 AXS derailleur is slightly more robust than the XX1 counterpart – great for aggressive riding in burly terrain.

Red highlights across the bike include an Industry Nine stem as well as Chris King headset.

Red Chris King hubs are laced to WTB rims built in-house. A variety of DT Swiss spokes are available depending on performance and weight goals.

Keeping this Mullet HD5 under control in the steeps are Magura HC rotors with Magura MT5 brakes with HC levers.


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Ride Concepts Powerline – First Ride Review

Ride Concepts Shoe Review

Ride Concepts Powerline First Ride Review

The contact points on your bike make a huge difference in your riding. Have the right pedals with the wrong shoes? Well, it’s kind of like being “sort of” pregnant I guess. (it doesn’t work)

I was drawn to the Powerline for a couple of reasons. DST 4.0 Rubber & D3o inlays.

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BikeCo Tips & Tricks: Understanding Rear Shock Negative Air Chamber

Understanding Rear Shock Negative Air Post

BikeCo Tips & Tricks: Understanding Rear Shock Negative Air Chamber

A fairly common question is “why does my rear shock lose air when I check it?” While there are mechanical issues that may cause air loss not pre-charging a pump or understanding how the negative air chamber works are more often the culprit.

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BikeCo Tips & Tricks: Service Chris King Headset Bearings

How-To Repack King Bearings Post

BikeCo Tips & Tricks: Service Chris King Headset Bearings

Enjoy a quick video and write-up that illustrates how to easily service Chris King headset bearings. One of the great draws to these products is with very basic maintenance you can expect them to easily last the lifespan of your bike.

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